Tai Chi Classes

The Dallas Wu Style Tai Chi group meets every Saturday morning at 9am in Kalachandji's classroom

 
Wu Style Tai Chi

Tai Chi is generally practiced as a slow, continuously flowing, weight-bearing exercise.   Sets of movements, or postures, are linked together in slow motion to produce the exercise set known as "the form".  This form is the basis of what most people do to practice tai chi.  This form is done standing, usually in normal street clothes.  While no special clothing is required, it is suggested to wear clothes that allow freedom of movement and flat-soled shoes.  

There are many ways to practice Tai Chi.  There are 5 major styles of traditional Tai Chi, those whose origins were from a martial arts perspective.  There are other styles that recently have evolved for addressing chronic conditions arising from arthritis, diabetes and other conditions.

The style we practice is the Wu style.  Our former teacher, Mr. Eng Khoo was a disciple of the Wu family and was trained in in the martial aspects, as well as the healing ways of Tai Chi.  Tai Chi helped him heal after being malnourished during World War II.  After regaining his strength, one of his passions in life was the promotion of Wu style Tai Chi.  He placed emphasis on the healing, health-oriented side of Tai Chi.  He taught wherever he could, including in the Crow Collection of Asian Art, until his passing last year.  

This class has moved to Kalachandji's.  We would love for you to join us. 

His former student, Mark Holmgren, continues teaching in his tradition.  Fascinated by martial arts for many years, he came to Tai Chi through the study of another martial art - Aikido.  Looking initially for a way to heal after a strenuous workout, he found that practicing Tai Chi helped tremendously.  After a period of studying only from books and tapes he was very fortunate to begin to learn from Mr. Khoo.  Following several years of study, Mark was asked to be a substitute teacher when Mr. Khoo was on vacation or ill.  In 2009 he took over Mr, Khoo's YMCA class and formally took over his Crow Collection (museum) class with his teacher's passing in 2016.   

Consider the following to see if Tai Chi might be right for you:

o Tai Chi is excellent for health, balance, back problems, and one's 
   general internal energy flow and energy balance.

o Tai Chi movements are slower than those in hatha yoga. 

o The Wu style Tai Chi movements that we practice keep you closer 
   to your center of gravity (compared to other Tai Chi styles and 
   hatha yoga).

o Tai Chi movements are all in a "standing" position--wear casual
   clothing that allows you to move about comfortably. We
   recommend flat shoes, but some do Tai Chi in bare feet.

o Just come anytime and join in -- there are no prerequisites.

o You can come late or leave early -- we have an informal gathering.

o We send optional e-mails to alert you when we have class schedule 
   changes or special events.

o There is no charge for the Wu Style Tai Chi class.

o If you would like to visit the official international Wu Style Tai Chi website, then go to: www.wustyle.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Ayurveda Classes with Purusha Dasa


1st Monday of each month at 7pm
Kalachandji's classroom 

No Admission; Donations gladly accepted
  

Sep 5         Ayurveda for a Healthy Home (Vastu)

Oct 3         Daily Self Care - cancelled.  Please check back for schedule updates

Nov 7         Science of Sound Vibration 

Dec 5         Pain and Stress Relief

Purusha is currently an Ayurvedic Practitioner in Dallas. Since 1992 he has been studying, practicing and teaching Suddha Ayurveda, a strictly Vaisnava-based form of Ayurveda. He is certified as a Suddha Ayurveda Therapist by the Dhanvantari Institute in Boston and was engaged in a comprehensive monastic program for six years, receiving pancha samskara (five-fold initiation) in 2003, and purohita (priest) ordination in 2005. He also assisted his teacher in the translation and composition of The Moon on the Branch, the central teaching text of Suddha Auyurveda.